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Journal Publication
Research Title AMOUNT OF WEIGHT BEARING DURING SIT-TO-STAND IN AMBULATORY PATIENTS WITH SPINAL CORD INJURY WHO WALKED WITH AND WITHOUT A WALKING DEVICE 
Date of Distribution 26 April 2016 
Conference
     Title of the Conference 20th European Congress of PHYSICAL and REHABILITATION MEDICINE 
     Organiser European Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (ESPRM) 
     Conference Place The Estoril Congress Center Estoril 
     Province/State Lisbon Portugal 
     Conference Date 23 April 2016 
     To 28 April 2016 
Proceeding Paper
     Volume 52 
     Issue 1 (2) 
     Page 602 
     Editors/edition/publisher Stefano NEGRINI 
     Abstract Introduction: Sit-to-stand (STS) is a pre-requisite for many other daily activities. To perform independent STS, an individual must be able to take most weight on the legs. Thus, the task is very mechanically demanding. However, there is no evidence on amount of weight bearing during STS in ambulatory individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who walked with or without a walking device. Purpose: This study cross-sectionally compared the amount of weight bearing during STS in 16 subjects with SCI who walked with (6 subjects) or without a walking device (10 subjects). Methods: All subjects were measured amount of weight bearing during STS (minimum, maximum and average) using a digital load cell for 3 trials/subjects. The findings were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test with the level of significance at p < 0.05. Result: The amount of maximal weight-bearing during STS of subjects who walked with a walking device was 78% of the body weight whereas that for those who walked without a walking device was 102%. Their maximal ability of body-weight support was significantly different between the groups (p < 0.05). Discussion and conclusions: The momentum occurred while performing the STS task made the levels of weight bearing exceeds amount of body-weight of each individual (102%) who walked without a walking device. Nevertheless, subjects who walked with a walking device could support their body weight significantly less than those who walked without a walking device. Thus, the improvement for amount of body-weight support during STS may help to promote walking ability. In addition, ability of independent STS without hand support may be used as a quantitative target criterion for ability to wean off a walking device of ambulatory patients with SCI. 
Author
575090010-0 Miss LALITA KHUNA [Main Author]
Associated Medical Sciences Master's Degree

Peer Review Status มีผู้ประเมินอิสระ 
Level of Conference นานาชาติ 
Type of Proceeding Abstract 
Type of Presentation Poster 
Part of thesis true 
Presentation awarding false 
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